Lizzy Roxburgh Voice Over Artist

How Lizzy Created Her Professional Voice-Over Career From Scratch

Today I’m talking to Lizzy Roxburgh ( Roxy)  who currently lives in Bali and is a nomadic voice-over artist. She’s held a myriad of jobs from a kindergarten teacher, to bar work and now professional nomadic voice-over artist. We talk a lot about how she started, how she travels and does her work and what a voiceover artist actually does.  Also, she generously shares a lot of information and top tips, which will be super useful,  if you are considering entering the world of voice-over. We talk about some of the weird and wonderful jobs shes turned down,  plus some of the crazy stunts she’s had to pull to get her voice-over job done while travelling. This is a really interesting and fun interview, so please keep reading.

Q.

I’m so excited to talk to you. So, let’s start, what are you doing right now? Why are you in Bali?

A.

Good question. So, I’ve been in Bali for a couple of weeks and I was living in Chiang Mai previously for about seven or eight years altogether, with some time away. Chiang Mai has been a base for a long time but at this time of the year, it gets really smoky. The pollution is outrageous like Beijing levels. If you’ve been to Chiang Mai, you’ll know that usually, you can see the mountain from wherever you are in town, but at this time of year, you can’t even see the mountain.

So, I put myself through it repeatedly over many years and this year I was like, “No, I’m getting away, going to live by the sea for a little bit.” Bali is lovely, as I’m sure you’ve discovered. So, I’m going to stay here for a few months and then see what happens next.

Q.

How exciting. You said you were in Chiang Mai for a very, very long time. Where are you from originally?

A.

I’m from the UK originally. I grew up in Suffolk but I’ve lived in many places around the UK, Brighton was my home base for a long time before I left.

Q. 

I love Brighton, it’s amazing. So, I’m keen to find out how you managed to leave the glamorous lifestyle of living in these in incredibly exotic beautiful countries and surviving. Are you a princess?

A.

In Chiang Mai, I was a teacher for a long time. I did kindergarten teaching for about five years and I’ve recently had a big change, and now, I’m a freelance nomadic voice-over artist.

So what happened? Did the kids keep telling you, we like your voice miss or something like that? How did that change come about because it’s quite, quite a drastic one?

It is quite a drastic change yeah. I guess I had a couple of quite big drastic changes in my life in terms of what I do. Originally, back in 2003, I trained as an actress. That was my original dream, I wanted to do theatre and I did a lot of vocal training back then, a lot of singing.

After I finished my acting training, as a lot of people do, I started working in a bar. I had this idea in my head, which I realize now was an idea that I probably put there, which was you’ve done your acting training, you’ve got two choices. You either go for it and you become a successful actor, or you wait tables and you do bar work. On this day, I didn’t really have the confidence to push myself. I got a job in a bar and pretended that I was looking for an agent, and I wasn’t really.

Then I realized that I was having loads of fun, and I actually really loved working in bars. It’s brilliant, your office is a party and you’ve got an instant community of cool friends, most people are artists, musicians or writers or they’re doing something cool, and not many people are doing it because they want to work behind the bar.

But it’s loads of fun. I stayed in it and I ended up doing it for about 10 years of my life, moving from city to city in the UK. I forgot about acting altogether and I got to the point where I worked my way up as much as you can within the bar world, I was assistant manager of a cool music venue in Brighton and I loved it, but I felt like I’d worked myself into a bit of a trap. I felt like at this stage, I had a degree in acting, which felt useless and all these years of experience of putting drinks in cups.

I felt like I’d hit a wall and I was exhausted. It didn’t feel sustainable. I didn’t want to go into my 30s putting drinks in cups, so I was like, “I need to think of something else.” I decided to give myself a break and to figure out a plan that I would go and live in a forest in India.

Q.

That’s pretty random, so what came next? 

A.

Isn’t that what everyone does when they can’t think of what to do next? I found this amazing reforestation project in India, and at the time I was like, “This is what I’m going to do. I’m going to go plant trees in India and I’m going to stay there forever.”

I stayed for about six weeks and then I was like, “Actually no, I want to go travelling.” So, I went travelling and met all kinds of people doing amazing stuff. I met people who were teaching English abroad. I was like, “Is this a thing that I could actually do? But I don’t have a TOEFL or a certificate.” They were like, “Well, get one, you can get one. It’s not that big of a deal.” So, basically I decided, I had a flight back to the UK, and I just didn’t get on it.

Q.

What did your friends and family say?

A.

I had some mixed reactions. Most people’s responses were, “Okay, are you okay? Are you sure?” But I was like, “I’m going to figure out a way to make it work, and I’m going to teach English.” So, I did.

I started teaching English in Malaysia at first, then I moved to Vietnam and I taught English there. I was just winging it, in Vietnam. I didn’t really know what I was doing, but there’s a lot of work there. Eventually, I decided, after six months of winging it, if I’m going to teach people English, I want to do it properly.

So, I decided to go to Chiang Mai to get my certification. I never left, I fell in love with Chiang Mai and I stayed there and I taught for five years. I guess that was the first major transition of how I went from bar work to being a teacher in the highlands.

Again, after about five years, I started to have the same feeling that I had in bar work. Kindergarten teaching is so much fun but it’s actually pretty similar to bar work, four-year-olds and drunk people, they’re not that different from each other. They run around and say hilarious things. I was tired. I guess my heart wasn’t 100% in it. Anyone who’s done teaching will know unless you’re a teacher at heart and you really want to teach people, it’s not sustainable.

Q.

I’ve done it and I found the same after about a year. I was like, “Okay, this is fun but I’m bored with this now.” You’re not really learning as the teacher are you if you like learning?

A.

Yeah. Well, they do say, to be a successful teacher, you should be a full-time learner as well, but I know my ABCs and I’ve got it, counting up to 10, got it down. So, I was starting to feel like it was time for a change.

Randomly, a friend of mine got me on to a post that they’d seen where someone was looking for a voice over artist for a kind of weird job. It was actually one of my best friends, who also happened to be a colleague in the kindergarten. He was like, “I think you should do this.” So, I went for it and it was a weird job. It was I’m basically playing the voice of a car. This car company I believe is the maker.

I didn’t know anything about cars but when you hire this car and you get into it, you’ll hear my voice saying, “Hello, I’m Natalie, a Jaguar Vanden Plas built in Germany in  …”  I introduce the car, talk about when and where it was built. I wrote to the guy, I gave him a sample, I got the job and was like, “Wow! Cool, okay, I guess I just got my first freelance voiceover job. That’s pretty cool.”

Again, I was talking to my friend Brian in the kindergarten about how much I loved it, doing that voice=over project and he said, “Why don’t you do this? You love it, why don’t you do it?” I was like, “You can’t be a freelance voice-over artist can you?” I thought that to be a voice-over artist, you had to have an agent. You had to be going into a studio and working with a producer and a director and all of these things. But then, he started telling me about all these freelance platforms that you can work from like Upwork and Fiverr, that I’d never had of before. I didn’t even know it was a thing.

We had a look together and it turns out, there were lots of voice-over artists doing this from these platforms. At this time in my life, an opportunity for me came up to go and live in rural France. I don’t speak any French, so, I realized that the only way for me to make money in this situation was to force myself to earn a living online.

So, as a backup, I continued teaching children online, which is even worse than teaching in real life, for me anyway. I decided to give it a go at becoming a freelance voice-over artist. I had this luxury situation where I was living in rural France, I didn’t actually have any friends or any social life, there was nothing for me to do apart from figure out how to make this thing work, how to become a freelance voiceover artist.

It took a while and it took a lot of research, a lot of learning and a lot of figuring out how to do it by myself. But eventually, I got to the point where I made it work. Circumstantially, I came back to Asia, back to Chiang Mai and now Bali and I’m continuing to do it wherever I go.

Q.

That’s amazing. So, how do you manage then, without a studio?

A. 

So, it is possible to set up your own studio space at home. You need some reasonably decent equipment, you need a good enough microphone, but the most important thing that I think a lot of people don’t realize, is the acoustic fitment of the room.

You do have to spend a little bit of time and effort making sure that there isn’t any echo in your space, which you can do with acoustic foam, hanging fabrics. I’m lucky enough to have a brother who’s a sound engineer, then he taught me a few little tips and tricks about where and how to hang fabric, what kind of fabric and foam to use to soundproof your space.

Q. 

It sounds like you’ve made your voiceover work reasonably portable although you’re staying in places for long periods of time, aren’t you?

A.

Right. I would love to do that if I could, and one day I hope to own really portable studio solution. They do exist. But at the moment, it takes me about a day to set up my acoustics and to sound test and check everything and to make sure I’m good to go. In some circumstances, it takes a little bit longer. So, it’s mobile but I like to stay in one place for a while. I have been in situations where I’ve had to go somewhere temporary without a studio and find a solution and it can end up being ridiculous.

Q.

I’d love to hear more about it. That sounds fun.

A.

There was one place where went to stay. I was in Chiang Mai and I went to house sit for a friend, and I got to look after a kitten whose name was George Michael, can you imagine?

So, I couldn’t turn it down. I had to stay there with George Michael. It was right next to a really busy road, a really busy road in Chiang Mai. Even though when you walked in you felt it. On the microphone, it picked up a kind of like this deep rumble that no matter how many audio tricks, how many editing tricks I tried, taking out the lower end frequencies or whatever, I could not get rid of this noise.

So, the only room in the house where you couldn’t hear the road is the bathroom. But like I said earlier, you’ve got to get rid of the echo. Echo’s your worst enemy when you’re doing voice over. But as everyone who sings in the bathroom knows, it’s the most echoey room in the house.

It sounds lovely when you’re in it but when you’re recording, it’s really bad. So, in order to get the echo out of the bathroom, what I had to do was drag every sofa in the house into the room.  By the way, don’t worry, they had two bathrooms. I wasn’t using this bathroom at the same time. But, I had to drag every sofa in the house into the bathroom and make this den of sofas, which I had to cover over the top with like duvets, and sheets and everything that I could find to dull out the sound.

Then, once I had done all of this, I realized that the lights in the bathroom activated the ceiling fan, which made a little rururu noise. So, in order to cut that off, I had to do it in the pitch dark. Being in south-east Asia, under every single sofa, blanket, duvet, pillow you can find, it was boiling hot. So, I also had to work naked. So, I’m there in the bathroom, surrounded by all the sofas, duvets, and pitch dark because of the fan and naked because it was too hot, trying to record very serious e-learning programs for a law firm.

So, from now on, I really make sure, before I go and stay in a place, that I can acoustically trace it without it being too ridiculous.

Q. 

That’s an incredible story, isn’t it? You making it work whatever the situation, that’s commendable. I’m sure you could write a book actually about it. People write books on the sheds they create, you could write a book about your voice-over workspaces! 

A.

Maybe I will one day.

Q. 

I’m not overly familiar with voice-overs outside of TV advertising or animated movies or things like that really. You mentioned e-learning. Who else would you be working for? You mentioned the car, is there any other weird and wonderful examples you might have?

A.

So I can tell you about weird and wonderful and I can tell you about what my run of the mill, what most of my jobs are. I’d say, probably about 50% of my work is me doing this. “If you’d like to speak to someone in sales, press 2 now.” I’m sorry that’s me, I’m that person.

So, a lot of telephone systems, a lot of explainer videos for new apps, a lot of social media marketing videos, a lot of e-learning programs and corporate training programs, a lot of corporate training programs.

In big company staff always have to go and watch a video about how to use the latest software or company policies or whatever, I underwrite a lot of those. There’s also some weirder stuff that I get asked to do. Would you like to hear about weird jobs that I’ve done or weird jobs that were so weird that I turned them down?

Q. 

Let’s hear more of the weird and wonderful examples of your voice-over stories 

A.

This one’s a little bit sad actually, but it’s one of the most bizarre things I’ve ever been asked to do for money, and I did turn it down. I just like to be clear about that! A guy wrote to me and asked me if I would record messages for him every day. It was a personal job and he told me that he’s 30, he lives at home with his mom, nobody likes him and nobody’s ever going to have sex with him, and he wanted to be reminded that on a daily basis.

I could only imagine that it was a fetish kind of thing. Maybe it wasn’t true. I found out afterwards that actually a lot of really successful people somehow get off on being told the opposite. Anyway, I didn’t do it. It would put me in the weirdest mood every day if I had to tell someone those things. I’ve been asked to explain the videos for products that I had no idea existed, the weirdest of which, was probably the artificial virginity kit. Did you know that’s a thing?

Yeah, it’s a thing. I looked into it and it’s really a thing. It’s I guess for countries primarily where virginity is held in high regard, and women are judged on that. So, they feel that they need to prove their virginity.

So, it comes with a latex hymen, a little mini blood capsule and tightening cream, all of which produces the effect of virginity. That was a real tough one for me. When that job came through, I was like, “Where do I stand on this? How do I feel about my voice being used for things that make me feel a little bit uncomfortable?” So, I often find myself having to think about where I sit with something ethically or personally, and if I want my voice being used for that.

When that job came up, I threw out a post on Facebook saying, “I’ve got a weird job request and I need help.” So, everyone was curious. They were like, “What is it, what is it, tell me about it.” So, I chatted to lots of people and it was really interesting to see the divide amongst my friends, between people who are like, “Do it, if you don’t, someone else is going to do it, take the money, do it.

” Other people were like, “How does it make you feel? Is that something that you want to be involved in?” At the end of the day, I decided that I didn’t want my voice to be used. I didn’t want to be the voice of a product that perpetuated a cycle where women were judged for their sexual history, so, I said no. But it was fascinating, looking into this world of artificial virginity kits.

Q.

You have some really amazing voice-over stories, do you have any more? 

A.

I’ve recently got a role in, I guess you’d call it animated series, it’s like it was originally written like a graphic novel I think, and it’s been made into more of an animated video, but it still is like comic book style imagery with voiceovers and it’s called Lesbian Zombies From Outer Space. I actually think it’s amazing. It’s really well written, it’s really funny. It’s basically a parody of the way straight men fetish lesbianism. I think it’s hilarious. It’s on YouTube if you want to check it out, but it is definitely not safe for work. Don’t look in the office.

Just as a disclaimer, it is not for the weak-hearted. It is actually very graphic. So, don’t watch it if you’re easily offended.

Q.

Looking towards the future, what kind of things do you really like working on? Like what would be your ideal job?

A.

I love recording audio books. It definitely has more of that element of acting, it was my background that I was trained in, and you can get really stuck into a long project, you can get involved with all the different characters in the book. But I love the variety of the jobs that I do as well, so, I’m really happy to carry on doing all sorts of different things every day.

Q. 

I’ve recently just got into audiobooks actually. So far, all I’ve listened to is business books, so they only have one character. If you were reading a novel, do you read all the characters or is it like the Archies where there are loads of different characters?

A.

As far as I know, that’s a choice that the author can make. I’ve definitely seen or heard some audio books where different characters are played by different people. My personal preference is to have a storyteller who can make subtle changes to their voices, you feel what character you’re being spoken to by, without it feeling like a radio play. To me, an audio book and a radio play are really quite different things.

Q.

What’s your favourite job been so far?

A.

I’d say my favourite job would probably be the first audiobook that I did. It’s called Once Upon A Path, and it’s by Edwina Gustafson. It’s a short book but it’s a lovely story with lots of different characters in it, and it was a real learning curve for me because it was my first audiobook. I’d never done that before, so there was a lot I had to learn technically, and there was a lot I had to learn about how to give the book a good through line, whilst making the characters distinctive and different, but without losing the voice of the story as a whole. Also, the fun thing about this book is that the chapters alternate between two narrators.

So, it’s a book about past lives and the main character Imogen, was a boy in several past lives ago. So, it switches between these two voices. So, I had to find a way to use my voice to be the voice of this character, which has the same soul.

So, it’s one soul, two different voices. A 30-year-old woman and a 14-year-old boy. It was definitely an acting challenge but it was so much fun. I worked with the author, we did lots of Skype interviews, working on the different voices, we passed audio back and forth until we were happy, until she was happy with the way that it sounded. It was so much fun.

Q.

I’m guessing voice-over work is like teaching, you have to prepare. You can’t just all of a sudden walk into a room and start teaching. There is some preparation that needs to be done. In terms of voice-overs, how do you prepare? There must be quite a lot of preparation?

A.

That really depends on the type of job that it is. The jobs really vary. If I get an on the phone message, I can sight read it. I don’t have to practice reading which button you have to press to get through to the receptionist or whatever.

But sometimes I get really technical scripts, medical scripts for example or legal scripts. I recently did a training program for a legal firm, which was just full of words I didn’t understand, or I’d never heard before. To be able to explain something with enough conviction that you’re teaching someone how to do something, you have to really understand these terms, or at least understand how to say the sentences-

So that one, I had to go through, find all the words, highlight all the words that I wasn’t sure about, look them up, then understand them within the context of the sentence, within the context of the paragraph.

With commercial scripts, it’s a different preparation. So, radio commercials or TV commercials, where they want you to use a really dynamic voice that goes all over the place like that.

I’ve learnt to look at the scripts like a piece of music and to understand where the pauses need to be, where my voice needs to go up or where it needs to go down, where it needs to sound more heavy and serious or where it needs to just sound lighthearted and casual.

So, it takes a bit of preparation, but the more I’ve got used to it, the more there are some words, as soon as I see them I know how to use them.  I’m trying to just think of an example off the top of my head where with some words, where I see them on the page and I know almost instantly how it needs to sound.

It’s almost like onomatopoeia. Like for example, if there’s the word quick, you’re not going to read it like this, quick. You’re going to say, quick. Or if there’s the word exciting, you’re not going to say exciting. You’re going to say exciting. You bring an element of that word into it and it adds to the meaning because the meaning is being reflected in the sound. Does that make sense?

It’s something that I started to do intuitively so to try and explain it is difficult.

Q.

It sounds like a lot of that’s probably come from your actress background and your training. That a lot of these things that you think is intuitive is actually probably deeply embedded and trained into you. So, do you think that this is something that I, for example, could suddenly pick up and start doing?

A.

It’s definitely fun and I do think that it’s something that anybody potentially could get into if they really wanted to. I’d be reluctant to use the word suddenly.

It definitely took me a long time before it was my sole source of income. It took me, I remember it was about four months when I earned my 1,000th dollar. So, obviously, that’s not sustainable. I wouldn’t recommend to anyone, just to quit their day job to become a freelance voiceover artist.

However, the cool thing is, everyone’s voice is different and unique. There’s a need, there’s a high demand for voice-over actually, higher than you might imagine. People don’t think about it until, sometimes until I talk to them about it, and then you realize that you hear voices everywhere. You go to the shopping mall and you hear voices over the tunnel all the time, you go online and there’s like voices coming out of-

In the lifts, on the tube in London, everywhere. So, there’s a real high demand for it and everyone’s voice is different. So, maybe you have a deep booming voice and there’s a need for that, and those are jobs that I couldn’t necessarily do, or maybe you sound like a kid when you talk, which is amazing because then you can do cartoons like the Simpsons. They’re all done by adults.

Obviously, the better you are at manipulating your voice the more work there is for you. But, if its something that people are interested in doing, I’d say, set aside some time in your free time, give it a try, learn a little bit of audio editing, that’s really important by the way. You have to learn how to do audio editing.

Q.
Do you use specific tools for that? Is that like an industry standard for voice over work?

A.

I actually use software, which is way more complicated than it needs to be for voice-over work. I use a program called Reaper, which I just love but it’s got way more functions. You can use programs like Audacity or whatever, they’re much more common and not as complex to use.

Q. 

If somebody wanted to get started, would you say that they could just take their phone, their iPhone or their Android, whatever, and just start trying to record and read things out or is there … You’d probably skip that part because you’d already done the training for vocal work.

A.

 

To be honest with you, I had done training for vocal work and I’d done a few jobs in studios with directors, working with directors, but it was quite a new experience doing it by myself and figuring out my relationship with the microphone and how to direct myself.

When I look back on some of the voice overs I was doing when I first started doing it as a freelancer, they’re horrible. I was shouting into the microphone in some of them pretty much. So, I definitely had to go through that process of doing a lot of voice over practice, listening back to myself. People think that because I’m a voiceover artist, I don’t have that thing where I die when I hear my voice recorded. No, I still have that.

I’m going to die when I listen to this, yeah for sure. It doesn’t go away, although you get better at listening to it from a technical point of view. I had to practice a lot and it’s definitely a skill that I’m still developing and learning as I go, which I love. I love listening to voiceovers that I did four months ago that I thought were great, and listening to them and being like, “Oh now I’d do it like that, I’d do it like that.”

Q.

 I suppose it’s like anything. It’s not really anything that you can just pick up, start running with and become amazing at. Even the best athletes in the world. everybody has to train themselves to not necessarily achieve perfection, but nobody is going to pay you if you don’t know what you’re doing.

A.

Absolutely. I guess some people have more of a natural talent towards doing it than others, but I think everyone with a bit of training and practice could maybe give it a go.

Q.

I have my favourite question for you now. I love talking about inspiration and creativity. Obviously, your job’s quite inspiring in itself, but how do you keep inspiring yourself?

Like I was saying earlier, there’s voiceover everywhere and you don’t notice it until you start to think about it. But now, I’m obsessed with voice-overs. Every time I take a flight, I’ll listen really carefully to the flight announcements and honestly, I’ve taken a lot of Air Asia flights lately, I could tell you so much about the voice of the woman who does the Air Asia announcements.

She does a great job, I don’t want to say anything personally about her, but I’m constantly listening to if there’s sibilance or if I would have taken a certain intonation differently or if I think things sound authentic or not. I’ve just suddenly become hyper-aware of this, well the voice overs all around me and I really listen to them. It’s almost distracting.

Q.

Do you think living abroad has changed you? Do you feel different now?

A.

Yeah, for sure. I think there’s so much to learn. There’s so much to learn about living in a different culture, about yourself, about how you relate to other people. About how much of culture is actually totally constructed, and things like that. Back in England, I thought it was just how we do things, that’s just life, it’s what we do, it’s all made up. It’s all made up and it changes wherever you go, and that’s so freeing, so, to be able to view yourself and observe yourself in a totally different context.

I came from this world of living in Brighton and working in pubs and in a music venue, it was a really specific world where we lived in certain ways, we did certain things, we had a really specific lifestyle. To take yourself way out of that and to put yourself in South East Asia where everything’s different, it gives you a deeper sense of who you are, it gives you a deeper sense of what reality is.

It’s an amazing thing to do. It’s not easy, it’s scary as hell actually and sometimes it is difficult but, you learn more when you do the difficult stuff, I think.

Q.

Would you say that it’s definitely helped you with confidence, and would you rather consider throwing yourself back into acting for example?

A.

I’ve continued to do acting, not professionally so much but I’ve done a lot of acting in Chiang Mai and part of like a lot of theatre groups there, I was pretty much always in something. That’s the lovely thing about acting or many things that you can do for hobbies. You don’t have to do it professionally.

You can keep doing all of your stuff wherever you go. But actually, I think living in south-east Asia gave me a bit more time to get back into that kind of stuff. I wasn’t doing it so much in Brighton, because I was caught up in my little world of pubs and going out and all of that fun stuff. Chiang Mai’s got a much more slow pace to it, so, I found there was more time to get more deeply into my hobbies and the things that I’m passionate about doing in my spare time.

Q.

Are there more apart from the acting?

A.

 

I play guitar and sing, that’s probably my favourite thing to do in the world, I also love painting, I love writing, basically any kind of creative outlet. I kind of need to be doing something creative at all times.

Q.

That’s amazing. It does sound like a bit of a dream life I have to say.

A.

It’s really nice to hear you describe it that way. I guess it’s easy to take your own life for granted. So, to have someone else say that, it’s really nice, thank you.

Q.

One of the questions I always ask people is, how do you not get burned out? I’m very prone to burn out. Even though we’re in a very beautiful location, certainly, it doesn’t stop you from working just because there are palm trees and swimming pools around. It doesn’t necessarily mean that you have to sit by them. You can work yourself to death in a hotel room. I pulled 12 hours yesterday so, it happens there too. So, how do you deal with not working too much?

A.

That’s a good question. I mentioned just now that I feel like it has given me a bit more time and space to do other creative projects, but that means that sometimes you commit to a creative project and then a massive amount of work comes in.

For example, last year, there was a period where I was involved in three performance productions at one time. Then as soon as a big job comes in like e-learning programs tend to be big jobs that’ll take me a few days,  but I have less than a few days to do them in and I have to go to rehearsal.

You’ve definitely, definitely got to get good at time management. When you work for someone else, you don’t have to worry so much about time management because everything is set out for you.

It’s so tempting for me to wake up and be like, “Well, if no one’s making me go to work today, I’m going to sit in why underwear and paint.” But you’ve got to get a little bit discipline about managing yourself. So, what I tend to make sure I do now is, I write to-do lists every day, and I make sure I tick them off.

Say I have a week’s deadline for a job, I’ll think of it as a three-day deadline. I just get it done. Then if you get it done early, the client’s happy because you delivered early. Well in the work that I do anyway, there are times sometimes where I’ll be up all night editing, audio editing and trying to get a big job done for the deadline. But then, there are other times when I don’t have much work to do too.

Like today, I’ve got three jobs to do when I get home, one the phone message, one marketing message for when you’re on hold to this company and a podcast intro for a podcast about the apocalypse. So, that’ll take me about an hour and then I’ll probably go hang out somewhere.

Q.

 Amazing. It’s been incredibly inspiring to meet you, hang out with you, hear the stories. I really hadn’t thought that much about voice-overs before, but I can see now that it’s a huge topic.
It’s also very cool to hear that there’s a lot of work available. So, obviously, if people are interested in working with you, how can they find you? What’s the best way of actually maybe listening to some of your professional work and then contacting you? How would you suggest they do that?

 

A.

Well, I guess I would suggest that first of all, people have a listen to my demos because not every voice is right for everything. So, it’s important to check if my voice is right for you if you want to pick a voice over. You can find my demos on Sound Cloud if you search Roxyvox. Or search it by my name, Elizabeth Roxburgh.

Everything is also on my website plus I have a facebook page, where you can learn more about voiceovers work and what I am up to. I’d love for you to follow.

 

I’m Zoe Langman, a 42-year-old welsh Nomad. On December 19th 2017, I packed up my flat, put all my essentials into a suitcase, and started my Nomadic Journey. I don't think it's ever too late to reinvent or redesign your life. I'm currently in Bali on a creative sabbatical, planning my next lifestyle redesign.

1 comments On How Lizzy Created Her Professional Voice-Over Career From Scratch

Leave a reply:

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.